Home » Case Studies In Primary Medical Care: Social, Psychological, And Ethical Issues In Family Practice by Peter S. Houts
Case Studies In Primary Medical Care: Social, Psychological, And Ethical Issues In Family Practice Peter S. Houts

Case Studies In Primary Medical Care: Social, Psychological, And Ethical Issues In Family Practice

Peter S. Houts

Published October 1st 1990
ISBN : 9780271003450
Hardcover
196 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

The eight real-life cases presented in this book are designed to stimulate thinking about the special type of human relations problems encountered by primary care physicians. Primary medical care involves an integration of medical skills with social,MoreThe eight real-life cases presented in this book are designed to stimulate thinking about the special type of human relations problems encountered by primary care physicians. Primary medical care involves an integration of medical skills with social, psychological, and ethical decision-making ability. Since the Harvard Business School seeks a similar integration, the authors have emulated that institutions case-study method.The cases in this book were selected from the actual experiences of practicing physicians and are reported accurately except for disguised identities. All eight cases have been class-tested in a variety of learning situations, following the study method set forth in the Introduction. Following each case are Readings that highlight the issues concerned. The subjects of the case studies are: religious versus medical healing, industrial preventive medicine, seductive patients, family resistance to surgery, ethical conduct among colleagues, responsibility for community safety, and involvement in the lives of patients and their offspring. The final chapter is a guide for writing case studies, enabling the reader to develop teaching material from his or her own clinical experience.This book is designed to be used as a textbook for courses, seminars, and colloquiums involving students, residents, or practicing physicians in the growing field of family and community medicine. It will be of value in allied fields such as nursing, medical social work, public health administration, and pastoral counseling. Many practitioners will find it to be interesting armchair reading.