Home » Our Women in the War: An Address by Francis W. Dawson, Delivered February 22, 1887, at the Fifth Annual Re-Union of the Association of the Maryland Line, at the Academy of Music, Baltimore, MD by Francis W Dawson
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Excerpt from Our Women in the War: An Address by Francis W. Dawson, Delivered February 22, 1887, at the Fifth Annual Re-Union of the Association of the Maryland Line, at the Academy of Music, Baltimore, MDIn the writings of Count Montholon there isMoreExcerpt from Our Women in the War: An Address by Francis W. Dawson, Delivered February 22, 1887, at the Fifth Annual Re-Union of the Association of the Maryland Line, at the Academy of Music, Baltimore, MDIn the writings of Count Montholon there is the following passage: On great occasions, it is almost always women who have given the strongest proofs of virtue and devotion. The reason is that, with men, good and had qualities are, in general, the result of calculation, whilst in women they are impulses springing from the heart.Macaulay, in one of his essays, speaks of that perfect disinterestedness and self-devotion of which man seems incapable, but which is sometimes found in woman.This virtue, this perfect disinterestedness and self-devotion, was manifested on every side, and on all occasions, by Southern women during the Confederate war. Their constancy and fidelity, their tenderness and courage, their unfailing cheerfulness and patience, have no parallel in the history of human achievement and human suffering.Think for a moment of the peculiar circumstances. The soldiers on the Northern side fought as the Confederates fought, and were equally exposed to the fatigue of the march and the hazard of battle. But the Northern soldier was well-clad, well-fed, well-armed. Naught that science and wealth could furnish to make him an effective combatant was allowed to remain wanting. The Confederate, on the other hand, was stinted in his food, and, besides, was poorly equipped in arms and munitions. In a campaign, he was more often bare-backed and bare-footed than warmly clothed and well-shod.Apply the same test to the women. The mothers and wives, sisters and daughters, of the Northern soldiers were worn with anxiety as the Southern women were. The sword of affliction pierced every heart alike. But there was a striking difference, nevertheless. The bereavement of the Southern maid and matron was more agonizing than that of the Northern matron and maid, because the South risked more of its own flesh and blood than the North risked, family by family. This is not all. Apart from the fear of ill tidings of those in service, apart from the anguish that wounds, disease and death could bring, the Northern women had no special care or discomfort. They were in no danger themselves. There was no Milroy, no Butler, no Hunter, no Sheridan, no Sherman, to taunt and upbraid them, to strip them of their most precious mementoes, to steal or scatter their scanty store of provisions and burn their homos over their head.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.