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The The Mimic Mymy Mclusky

The The Mimic

Mymy Mclusky

Published July 5th 2015
ISBN :
ebook
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 About the Book 

Grant Lipsic has spent considerable time developing his misanthropic views. He is a sublime creature suffering internal conflict because he is currently engaged in several personal relationship that establish and feed his sense of self. He cannotMoreGrant Lipsic has spent considerable time developing his misanthropic views. He is a sublime creature suffering internal conflict because he is currently engaged in several personal relationship that establish and feed his sense of self. He cannot help but harbour positive emotions towards things that people make like beer, coffee and shoes. He has an inherent and ongoing conflict because the driver of his ribald hate is what people and industry do, that is, they progress. It is the externalities of this progress and a sense of entitlement that most individuals cultivate that are most likely the real drivers of his hate. Maybe Grant’s problem is modernity, but he is not a romantic. So what is it? In this day and age, it is pretty bloody hard being Grant Lipsic.Grant’s attitude and current station in life is that of a one bedroom flat close to the city. He works in the city, in an office, trawling for data which others turn into information. Grant has no car. The city is not named, it could be any city in the developed world. Grant could be your neighbour. His current station in life is juxtaposed with one of his neighbours, who he dislikes and labels a genuine arsehole, but he cannot help but spend time with him. His Chinese neighbours simply confuse him and a semi retried neighbour scares him because she is knowledgeable and essentially good natured.Grant’s story is a sequence of 8 days plus one more. His critique is on-going and Grant has this little thing going on in his head where lyrics pop up and offer a correlation between his thoughts and that of song writers. Grant is of the opinion that the world is shot and it is only going to get worse, so why bother? Why bother bringing new people into this mess to exacerbate the problem. Grant believes science will not save Homo sapiens, it just shifts the problems and creates new ones for science to solve. He is a strong believer in sentience. He opines that all creates big and small, cute and ugly are self-aware as much as humans are. He takes this belief to the next level and develops an anthropomorphic relationship. He calls the object of his projection Grace and they have conversations. Essentially, Grace agrees with him - image that? She protects and nurtures his attitude and bias by informing him that it is not him, but them. They have and are the cause of problems.This attitude and bias is explored via, amongst others, Grant’s relationship with his older brother. It is an important relationship because their parents died together when the brothers were teenagers and there are no other siblings. Because of his brother’s life choices, which are the exact opposite to Grant’s, Grant has to make a decision if he will retain their relationship or let it peter out. Other characters and strangers are in his field of view, some on a day to day basis. He has to deal with these people if he wants to retain a roof over his head. Grant moves through Sunday to Sunday, suffering experiences that entrench his attitude and move him closer to Grace. Through these days Grant gives us his theory of Mullet Tattoos and on Justice, IVF, the difference between cyclists and bikeriders, how smokers caused their own demise via aesthetics and how that aesthetic should be flipped over onto the obese. But his biggest worry and probably the best ground for a grand thesis is plastic. It is pretty bloody hard being Grant Lipsic.The narrative concludes with a single event. This event synthesizes and encapsulates Grant’s being. Is Grant dead inside? He will tell you that he is not. You may disagree with him. If you do then you are advocating that you are the cause of his demise.